Monday, August 11, 2008

Aren’t I clever?

A rich man bought a house with a large beautiful garden. Against the advice of his friends and neighbours, he decided to chop down all the fruit trees and shrubs and get rid of the pots of flowers which the previous owner had painstakingly planted over the years. What practical value have trees and flowers? What this house needs is a car park for my many cars as well as those of my visitors.

But it is such a waste, argued his neighbours; all the beautiful flowers gone just like that. The birds and insects will not visit your home anymore. Still the rich man went ahead with his plan and replaced the garden with what he thought was a beautiful tiled car park. Aren’t I clever, thought the man as he surveyed his spanking new car park.

Five years went by and suddenly the man realized that his house was rather bare; and hot, and uncomfortable. And many visitors had stopped coming. And so he hired an expensive landscaping consultant to advise him on how to improve his home. What your home needs is a big garden with lots of fruit trees and flowers to provide shade and attract insects and birds to you house.


Thus the man decided to build a big garden to beautify his house. And as he looked at the beautiful plans drawn up by his expensive consultant, he thought to himself; "Aren't I clever to come up with this brilliant idea?"

7 comments:

Zen said...

This is a case of reinventing the wheels which we sometimes think of it as a smart idea. However, this act is not only exclusive to the man mentioned in the story. If we are honest enough to list the number of silly things we do in the past, they could easily fill up pages. Coming to the merger of POSB and DBS, it is indeed a smart business strategy thought out by a shrew management team (govt). It is like siphoning the people's money - deposited in POSB, to create another giant called DBS so as to expand the latter interests. It can also liken to using the powerful lower-end product called Toyota, to create another another luxurious brand called Lexus serving exclusively rich customers.

Sleepless in Singapore said...

Actually, this new CEO admitted that it was a mistake to neglect POSB in the past few years. The 'man' in my story refers to the organisation as a whole.

Anonymous said...

"The expats came with empty brief cases and when they leave their brief cases are full" - so say a wise man upon the completion of a mega project many years ago.

Somewhat, wisdom is fleeting and so the story will go on and on.

Anonymous said...

It took an expat CEO to admit that it was a mistake to neglect POSB. When the ordinary Singaporeans howl and whine when they started closing down POSB branches and removing ATM terminals after the merger, the talented guys in DBS just ignored them. Now I see them reopening POSB branches here and there, right at the very old places they once existed. What a waste of money!

Anonymous said...

Sorry guys... are you assuming this new owner is going to replant the trees and flowers for you? Who do you think is going to pay for it? YOU the Customers...

Let me put it in another way:
Alright folks, there are suckers out there who still believe in Santa Claus. So why don't I buy you all new outfits and they'll gladly buy anything you SELL.

Get it?

kelly said...

When something like that happens, it's wise to look for an "alternative" bank before they start rebuilding and charging extra for nothing.

Anonymous said...

Sometimes ordinary folks are not that silly by depositing money only in POSB or DBS - why? The reason is simple, the govt being the richest (backed up by people's money). So if other banks were to fail, POSB or DBS would still likely stay afloat and the simple logic is that the govt does not want to be seen as a failure and untrustworthy, therefore would go all out to prop up their own banks if the situation demands. Furthermore, the beauty lies in the fact that only the govt is authorised to print its own currency notes, not others. So which banks are in that position? The writing is already on the wall, noting that a few prominent financial institutions
in the US have already gone bust.