Tuesday, June 05, 2007

Was That Really Necessary?

By now, if you do not know that Mediacorp artiste, Christopher Lee has been jailed for drink driving, you must be a hermit. And if you previously did not know who he was, you certainly do now. His face has been splashed all over the newspapers. The Straits Times even had one half of the front page of its Sunday Lifestyle Section covered with his photos.


Come on. I know the public has a right to know. And newspapers have a duty to report. But half a page? Now was that really necessary? The man is already paying a heavy price for his mistake. Is it really necessary to shame him further in this way?

5 comments:

zen said...

In the media world, it is common to turn bad news into something positive. For example the person who commited the offence would express remorse, going through self reflection, apologising to the victims (as well as to his fans), asked for forgiveness, and so on and so forth. This is a strategy of getting public sympathy, as well as getting good publicity. The press (especially the tabloids) meanwhile making a mountain out of a molehill. The main aim is none other than to sell more newspaper.

Victor said...

Newspapers do not just inform. They sensationalise news to get more readership, thereby boosting sales. It's all in the media game.

zen said...

Apart of informing the public and making money, newspapers have a moral duty of overseeing the well- being of the country through good judgement. A case in point, way back in 1950, the Maria Hertogh racial incident exploded (detailed story can be obtained through the net), partly due to play-up by the press through very telling photos shown, court proceedings and its verdict. I was then 7 yrs old, and my late father told me the story. He was of the opinion that the press played an instigating role in this tragic incident.

Lam Chun See said...

I think the ST is try to assist the authorities to send a message to the public about drink driving. Poor Mr Christopher Lee happened to be caught at the wrong time. Being quite well-known, he is ideal for the 'role'.

zen said...

Managers of celebrities are expert spinners. If their celebrities are caught in negligent driving, these managers know immediately that their stars by going to jail would become instant under-dogs, and public sympathy would be pouring in. So to turn negative things around, celebrities are told to do a bit of play-acting, which is not a problem because they are seasoned entertainers themselves, admitting remorse of their wrong doings, at the same time reminding others to be responsible drivers- so on and so forth.